10 Black Women Artists you need to watch this year

Rising stars

This international women's day we have focused our attention to some of the rising stars practicing Art today; from painters to sculptors and digital artists. Here are our top 10:

© Ariel Dannielle pictured

© Ariel Dannielle pictured

1. Ariel Dannielle

Atlanta born artist Ariel creates large scale paintings depicting her experience as a black woman. Previous exhibitions include the Zucot Gallery and Ariel is currently part of the Charles White Exhibition at the California African American Museum. 

@aridannielle



© Ekene Maduka

© Ekene Maduka

2. Ekene Maduka

Nigerian born artist Ekene Maduka connects with viewers through portraits (oil on canvas) and tells them a story of her personal experiences. Ekene was selected for #TDC20 and won sponsorship from The Dean Collection for her solo show a “Walk Back Home” and has participated in several group shows in Winnipeg. We are excited to see what's next for Ekene.

@ekenemaduka


© Nelsa Guambe pictured

© Nelsa Guambe pictured

3. Nelsa Guambe

Nelsa Guambe is a self-taught artist who lives and works in Maputo, Mozambique. Nelsa cofounded Deal Creative Space in Maputo, which promotes local Design, Entertainment, Art and Literature, and Piratasdopau; a design and production studio in Maputo. Nelsa alongside her twin sister and fellow artist Nelly co-founded the fashion brand Mimate.

@nelsaguambe

© Morenike Ajayi

© Morenike Ajayi

4. Morenike Ajayi

Morenike is a self-taught artist / graphic designer based in Toronto. Creating a series of dreamlike digital collages.

@morenike


‘La Belle de Luanda’ © Em Regnier

‘La Belle de Luanda’ © Em Regnier

5. Em Regnier

Em Regnier is a Haitian Canadian Photographer currently based in Dakar, having traveled throughout Africa, the Middle East, and Europe.

@em.regnier


© ‘Day IV (Plain George)’ Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, Tonia Nneji

© ‘Day IV (Plain George)’ Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, Tonia Nneji

6. Tonia Nneji

Nigerian Artist Tonia Nneji favours oil and acrylic on canvas. Tonia's paintings reflect personal experiences and address societal issues. In particular, depicting the painful experiences of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS).

@tonia_nneji


© Jacqueline Suowari

© Jacqueline Suowari

7. Jacqueline Suowari

Jacqueline is a Nigerian artist who creates stunning larger than life pieces in ballpoint pen and acrylic paint! The subjects are drawn in ballpoint pen and paired with vividly painted backgrounds.

@jacquelinesuowari

© Raphaële Anfré

© Raphaële Anfré

8. Raphaële Anfré

A Parisian Artist and Fashion Designer. Raphaële's paintings and illustrations are inspired by womanhood and fertility. Each piece is an expression of femininity, evident in the use of abstract shapes and curves. Raphaële's work will be dressing the room for our ‘Art meet supper club’ event on Wednesday 13th March. See more details here

@raphaele_ele

© Rayvenn D’Clark

© Rayvenn D’Clark

9. Rayvenn D’Clark

A London based sculptor who's most recent work explores the dynamics of Race, Gender & Commodification, in particular, the recently auctioned 'I Don’t See in Colour' (Plaster, 3D Print – pictured). Rayvenn's use of 3D scanning and digital manipulation technology presents a new-found opportunity to shed light on the beauty and undoubted complexity of the black body politic.

@rayvenndclark_art

© ‘Sometimes But Not Very Often’ Shannon Tamara Lewis

© ‘Sometimes But Not Very Often’ Shannon Tamara Lewis

10. Shannon Tamara Lewis

Berlin based artist Shannon Tamara Lewis practices both painting and fabric installation, underpinned by power and pleasure and Shannon’s subjects are seen to almost exist within different parallels. “Get Me Bodied” a fabric installation was recently exhibited at Alice Yard in Trinidad, we’re looking forward to what’s next for Shannon.

@lolas_venus


Written by: Swakara Atwell-Bennett

All images are the copyright of each respective artist.